WALTON COUNTY — A tornado touched down Sunday night near DeFuniak Springs.

Jeff Goldberg, director of Emergency Management, said residents of Walton County began calling emergency services around 7 p.m. to report what they believed was a tornado.

The National Weather Service, according to Goldberg, has been called in to investigate.

"Right now there isn't a whole lot of information to give," Goldberg said early Monday morning. "There have been no reports of damage to structures and no injuries. It's just trees and downed power lines."

At least 23 people were killed by another possible tornado in Alabama as severe storms destroyed mobile homes, snapped trees and left a trail of destruction and weather warnings extending into Georgia, Florida and South Carolina.

Dozens of emergency responders rushed to assist in Lee County, Alabama, after what appeared to be a large tornado struck Sunday afternoon as part of a powerful storm system raking the Southeast.

In DeFuniak Springs, the worst damage appears to begin at Coy Burgess Loop and extend north to Bob Sikes Road and Steel Church Road and east to Interstate 10 near U.S. Highway 331.

Eric Bunker, meteorologist for the National Weather Service in Tallahassee, confirmed it was a tornado Sunday night.

Goldberg said National Weather Service meteorologists will drive to DeFuniak Springs Monday afternoon to survey the damage and assess the storm's power.

"Anytime any weather comes through, we get calls into dispatch saying there are tornadoes, when in reality it's straight line wind damage," he said. "As far as we’re concerned, regardless of straight line winds and tornadoes, our concerns are the same — life safety, incident stabilization and property preservation."

The Daily News will update this story as more information becomes available.