The National Weather Service in Mobile says Tropical Depression Nine should hit well east of the Florida Panhandle sometime early Thursday morning.

Meteorologist Joe Maniscalco said at this point in time, he predicts TD 9 to head toward the Florida Big Bend. As a result, local areas should brace for rip currents from Tuesday through Thursday.

“The main thing of impact for the Florida Panhandle would be rip currents, dangerous to potentially dangerous,” Maniscalco said.

After Thursday, Mansicalco said to expect a front to bring rain. And going into Sunday and Monday, he said to expect a bit of dryer air.

“Things can change,” Maniscalco said. “It’s always good to have a plan of action. It is hurricane season.”

And while local officials weren’t expecting a significant local impact, they were keeping an eye on the Gulf.

Late Monday afternoon, the Walton County Sheriff’s Office sent out a news release advising that they were working with Emergency Management to identify strategies to prepare for the storm.

They included keeping personnel updated on the storm’s progress, encouraging them to make advance precautions, advance monitoring of flood areas and making sure emergency equipment, including generators, were operational.


Previous coveage

A strengthening Invest 99-L became Tropical Depression Nine on Sunday as it crossed the Florida Straights.

The National Hurricane Center predicts the storm may become Tropical Storm Hermine as early as Monday and could make landfall late Thursday in the Florida Panhandle.

On Sunday, TD Nine headed toward the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico. Once Hurricane Hunters aircraft inspected the storm on Sunday, Invest 99-L was upgraded to TD Nine. Once it becomes a tropical depression, the National Hurricane Center then officially begins a full battery of updates and tracking maps.

Invest 99-L is currently showing maximum sustained winds of 35 mph, but the National Hurricane Center was reporting Monday morning that is expected to steadily increase, reaching 65 mph within 120 hours.

TD Nine, which had been Invest 99-L for nearly a week as it slowly spun through the Caribbean, is expected to become Tropical Storm Hermine once it enters the 90-degree waters of the Gulf.

Most of the latest computer tracking models, which had been mixed early Sunday, now are predicting that TD Nine to come ashore near the Big Bend of Florida. A few models still project the storm to come ashore between Pensacola and Texas.

Jason Hess, a National Weather Service meteorologist in Jacksonville, said the path is not "set in stone right now, so everyone needs to monitor it."

The National Hurricane Center predicts that TD Nine will move westward into the southeastern Gulf of Mexico on Monday, "where environment conditions are expected to become more conducive for development,” according to a National Hurricane Center update on Sunday afternoon.

From there, hurricane center forecasters are calling for the system to move northward and then northeastward. On Sunday, the storm started bringing showers to South Florida and the Florida Keys.

“Interests elsewhere in Florida, as well as the eastern Gulf of Mexico, should continue monitoring the progress of this the disturbance,” the update read.

Three things to know about Tropical Depression Nine

Following are key items about the approaching tropical storm from www.wunderground.com

1.) This System Had Impacts Before it Became a Tropical Depression

This system has dumped locally heavy from the Leeward Islands to Hispaniola, the Bahamas and Cuba since last week.

In the Dominican Republic, the heavy rain displaced more than 1,700 people late last week, according to the Dominican Today.

Parts of eastern Cuba saw 3-5 inches of rain from the system on Saturday.

2.) Rain Will Likely Be the Greatest Impact in Florida

A moist southerly wind flow to the east of Tropical Depression Nine will keep Florida wet the next several days.

By late this week, the actual center of the system is forecast to move northeastwards towards the Florida Panhandle, resulting in more rainfall.

Some flooding is expected across parts of the state throughout the week ahead since the rainfall will be heavy at times.

Any other impacts, such as wind and water rise along the coast, will be dependent on the intensity of the system. At the moment, however, heavy rain seems to be the biggest threat.

3.) Why Did This System Take So Long to Become a Tropical Cyclone?

Since last week, the former Invest 99-L had been battling the two nemeses of tropical cyclones, dry air and wind shear.

Wind shear and dry air can slow or prevent the development of tropical systems.

Most recently, wind shear has been the biggest inhibitor to the development of this system.

Despite battling wind shear for days, a Hurricane Hunters reconnaissance mission finally found a sufficiently organized low-pressure center by Sunday evening, with collocated shower and thunderstorm activity, to prompt the National Hurricane Center to classify the previous Invest 99-L as Tropical Depression Nine.

Daily News Executive Editor Bob Heist and Joe Callahan of the Gainesville Sun contributed to this report

READOUT for WEB ONLY:

 

Three things to know about Tropical Depression Nine.

www.wunderground.com

1.) This system had impacts before it became a tropical depression. This system has dumped locally heavy rainfall from the Leeward Islands to Hispaniola, the Bahamas and Cuba since last week.

2.) Rain will likely be the greatest impact in Florida.

A moist southerly wind flow to the east of Tropical Depression Nine will keep Florida wet the next several days. By late this week, the actual center of the system is forecast to move northeastwards towards the Florida Panhandle, resulting in more rainfall.

3.) Why did this system take so long to become a tropical cyclone?

Since last week, the former Invest 99-L had been battling the two nemeses of tropical cyclones, dry air and wind shear. Wind shear and dry air can slow or prevent the development of tropical systems.

Source: www.wunderground.com

 

NWS: Tropical depression will hit in the east

 

By LEAH JOHNSON

315-4440 | @LeahJnwfdn

ljohnson@nwfdailynews.com

The National Weather Service in Mobile says Tropical Depression Nine should hit well east of the Florida Panhandle sometime early Thursday morning.

Meteorologist Joe Maniscalco said at this point in time, he predicts TD 9 to head toward the Florida Big Bend. As a result, local areas should brace for rip currents from Tuesday through Thursday.

“The main thing of impact for the Florida Panhandle would be rip currents, dangerous to potentially dangerous,” Maniscalco said.

After Thursday, Mansicalco said to expect a front to bring rain. And going into Sunday and Monday, he said to expect a bit of dryer air.

“Things can change,” Maniscalco said. “It’s always good to have a plan of action. It is hurricane season.”

And while local officials weren’t expecting a significant local impact, they were keeping an eye on the Gulf.

Late Monday afternoon, the Walton County Sheriff’s Office sent out a news release advising that they were working with Emergency Management to identify strategies to prepare for the storm.

They included keeping personnel updated on the storm’s progress, encouraging them to make advance precautions, advance monitoring of flood areas and making sure emergency equipment, including generators, were operational.