Residents should take precautions to avoid heat exhaustion, the Florida Department of Health in Okaloosa County states.


Residents should take precautions to avoid heat exhaustion, the Florida Department of Health in Okaloosa County states.



Tips:



•Dress in lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing



•Drink plenty of water; avoid alcohol and caffeinated drinks



•Eat smaller meals more often



•Reduce or eliminate strenuous activity outside or reschedule to coolest time of day



•Spend more time in air-conditioned places



•When outside, seek out shade during peak sun (between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.)



•Use sunscreen



Signs of heat exhaustion:



•Heavy sweating



•Paleness



•Muscle cramps



•Tiredness



•Dizziness



•Headache



•Nausea or vomiting



•Fainting



•Skin — cool and moist



•Pulse rate — fast and weak



•Breathing — fast and shallow



Untreated heat exhaustion may progress to heat stroke.



If you suspect heat exhaustion, try these cooling measures:



•Drink cool, nonalcoholic beverages, as directed by your physician



•Rest in an air-conditioned environment



•Take a cool shower, bath or sponge bath



•Wear lightweight clothing



•Prevent sunburn with a 30 SPF sunscreen



Seek medical attention immediately if symptoms are severe or you have heart problems or high blood pressure, a department spokesperson states. Otherwise, help the person cool off and seek medical attention if symptoms worsen or last longer than one hour.



Heat exhaustion, a milder form of heat-related illness, can develop after exposure to high temperatures and inadequate or unbalanced replacement of fluids.



Infants and children up to 4 years old, people 65 or older, and those who are overweight, ill or on certain medications are prone to heat exhaustion.