PRACTICAL MONEY SKILLS: Avoid tapping retirement plans early

Published: Tuesday, March 25, 2014 at 11:21 AM.

401(k) and IRA withdrawals

Many 401(k) plans allow hardship withdrawals to pay for certain medical or higher education expenses, funerals, buying or repairing your home or to prevent eviction or foreclosure. You'll owe income tax on the withdrawal – plus an additional 10 percent penalty if you're younger than 59 ½, in most cases.

Traditional IRAs allow withdrawals at any time for any reason. However, you'll pay income tax on the withdrawal – plus the 10 percent penalty as well, with certain exceptions. With Roth IRAs, you can withdraw contributions at any time, since they've already been taxed. However, to withdraw earnings without penalty you must be at least 59 ½ and the funds must have been in the account for at least five years.

To learn more about how the IRS treats 401(k) and IRA loans and withdrawals, visit www.irs.gov.

Further financial implications

With 401(k) and traditional IRA withdrawals, the money is added to your taxable income, which could bump you into a higher tax bracket or even jeopardize certain tax credits, deductions and exemptions that are tied to your adjusted gross income. All told, you could end up paying half or more of your withdrawal in taxes, penalties and lost or reduced tax benefits.

Losing compound earnings



1 2 3
Next

Reader comments posted to this article may be published in our print edition. All rights reserved. This copyrighted material may not be re-published without permission. Links are encouraged.

COMMENTS
▲ Return to Top
 

Local Faves