Residents along the Panhandle should keep track of the storm and forecasts due to the region's position along the dangerous east side of the hurricane. There have been no tornado warnings or watches issued, but AccuWeather noted in its report that isolated tornadoes Saturday evening into Sunday are possible.

4 P.M. UPDATE

Located just 50 miles south from the mouth of the Mississippi River, Hurricane Nate remained a Category 1 storm, according to the latest National Hurricane Center report.

Nate was holding maximum sustained winds of 90 mph and still remains in position to reach Category 2 status before landfall, though time is running out as it continues to track north-northwest at 23 mph. The storm's minimum central pressure dropped slightly to 981 millibars (28.97 inches).

The Weather Channel continues to report that the expectation is Nate's center will make one or more landfalls along the northern Gulf Coast, between southeast Louisiana and the far western Florida Panhandle, tonight into early Sunday, as at least a Category 2 hurricane. AccuWeather, however, is reporting its weather experts feel the storm will remain Category 1 at landfall.

Residents along the Panhandle should keep track of the storm and forecasts due to the region's position along the dangerous east side of the hurricane. There have been no tornado warnings or watches issued, but AccuWeather noted in its report that isolated tornadoes Saturday evening into Sunday are possible.

There were four changes to the Hurricane Center's warnings and watch lists, but only one in Florida where the Storm Surge Watch from the Okaloosa/Walton county line east to Indian Pass near Port St. Joe and Apalachicola was discontinued.

A Hurricane Watch, Storm Surge Warning and Tropical Storm Watch were discontinued in eastern Louisiana.

Remaining in effect for Northwest Florida was a Storm Surge Warning from Grand Isle, Louisiana to the Okaloosa/Walton county line; a Tropical Storm Warning from east of the Alabama/Florida border to Indian Pass; and a Hurricane Watch from east of the Alabama/Florida border to the Okaloosa/Walton county line

A turn toward the north and a slight decrease in forward speed are expected from Nate during the next several hours, followed by a turn toward the north-northeast later tonight. A complete motion toward the northeast is expected on Sunday.

On the forecast track, the center of Nate will pass near or over the mouth of the Mississippi River during the next few hours, then make landfall along the coasts of southeastern Louisiana or Mississippi tonight. After landfall, the center of Nate is expected to pass over portions of Mississippi, Alabama and Tennessee late tonight through Sunday night.

Storm surge appears to be a major concern for the Emerald Coast overnight into Sunday. According to the Hurricane Center, the following storm surge amounts are possible above ground if the peak surge occurs at the time of high tide:

Mouth of the Mississippi River to the Mississippi/Alabama border: 7 to 11 feet

Mississippi/Alabama border to the Alabama/Florida border, including Mobile Bay: 6 to 9 feet

Alabama/Florida border to the Okaloosa/Walton county line: 4 to 6 feet

Grand Isle, Louisiana to the mouth of the Mississippi River: 2 to 4 feet

Okaloosa/Walton county line to Indian Pass: 2 to 3 feet

Indian Pass to Crystal River: 1 to 3 feet

Morgan City, Louisiana to Grand Isle: 1 to 2 feet

Locally, the major influence of storm surge from Nate tonight will coincide with the following high tide times:

Grayton Beach: Saturday, 9:24 p.m.

Okaloosa Island: Saturday, 9:34 p.m.

Navarre Beach: Saturday, 9:35 p.m.

East Pass, Destin: Saturday, 11:49 p.m.

Dauphin Island, Alabama: Saturday 11:50 p.m.

Pensacola: Sunday, 12:19 a.m.

The Weather Channel reported that hurricane force winds extend up to 35 miles from the center of Nate, while tropical storm force winds currently reach up to 125 miles from the center. These winds are mainly occurring east of Nate's center, something commonly seen with hurricanes moving this fast.

Be aware as the storm turns north and northeast and travels over the Alabama and Mississippi coastlines, that could bring the Panhandle into play for increased storm surge and a wind event.

An impressive outer rain band is pushing through southeast Louisiana, and will approach the coast of Mississippi and Alabama soon.

Current watches and warnings in effect as Nate prepares to make landfall tonight are:

Hurricane Warning

—Grand Isle, Louisiana to the Alabama/Florida border

—Metropolitan New Orleans and Lake Pontchartrain

Storm Surge Warning

—Grand Isle, Louisiana to the Okaloosa/Walton county line

—Northern and western shores of Lake Pontchartrain

Tropical Storm Warning

—Lake Maurepas

—West of Grand Isle to Morgan City, Louisiana

—East of the Alabama/Florida border to Indian Pass

Hurricane Watch

—Lake Maurepas

—East of the Alabama/Florida border to the Okaloosa/Walton county line

1 P.M. UPDATE

There was no change from the 10 a.m. report other than announcing that outer rain bands from Nate were arriving in southeastern Louisiana.

10 A.M. UPDATE

Earlier in the morning slowly moving toward becoming a higher profile storm, Hurricane Nate is now expected to reach Category 2 status before landfall, according to the latest National Hurricane Center report.

At Category 2, AccuWeather is reporting that Nate "will slam the central Gulf Coast of the United States with damaging winds, storm surge, flooding and isolated tornadoes Saturday evening into Sunday."

Maximum sustained winds for Nate were recorded at 90 mph as the storm had moved within 180 miles from the mouth of the Mississippi River. The storm's speed had rocketed to 26 mph as its minimum central pressure had dropped to 984 millibars (29.06 inches).

One major change in advisories for Northwest Florida as Nate strengthens is a Tropical Storm Warning now extends from east of the Alabama/Florida border to Indian Pass, located eight miles south of Port St. Joe.

Remaining the same is the Hurricane Watch, Tropical Storm Warning and Storm Surge Warning from east of the Alabama/Florida border to the Okaloosa/Walton county line.

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Of note early Saturday morning is storm surge from Hurricane Nate is already being felt locally. The Okaloosa County Sheriff's Office reported that a low-lying area of Meigs Drive in Shalimar was already under water and the roadway was blocked off to traffic.

On the forecast track, the center of Nate will move across the northern Gulf of Mexico today and make landfall along the central U.S. Gulf Coast tonight. Expected to be a Category 2 storm, according to the Hurricane Center, hurricane force winds are currently extending outward up to 35 miles, primarily to the east of the center, and tropical storm force winds outward up to 125 miles.

The combination of a dangerous storm surge and the tide will cause normally dry areas near the coast to be flooded by rising waters moving inland from the shoreline. The water is expected to reach the following heights above ground if the peak surge occurs at the time of high tide.

Mouth of the Mississippi River to the Mississippi/Alabama border: 7 to 11 feet

Mississippi/Alabama border to the Alabama/Florida border, including Mobile Bay: 6 to 9 feet

Morgan City, Louisiana to the mouth of the Mississippi River: 4 to 6 feet

Alabama/Florida border to the Okaloosa/Walton county line: 4 to 6 feet

Okaloosa/Walton County Line to Indian Pass: 2 to 4 feet

Indian Pass to Crystal River: 1 to 3 feet

Unfortunately, there is high tide locally during the overnight hours Saturday as Nate makes landfall. Here are the times of high tide for several locations that are expected to experience storm surge flooding:

Grayton Beach: Saturday, 9:24 p.m.

Okaloosa Island: Saturday, 9:34 p.m.

Navarre Beach: Saturday, 9:35 p.m.

East Pass, Destin: Saturday, 11:49 p.m.

Dauphin Island, Alabama: Saturday 11:50 p.m.

Pensacola: Sunday, 12:19 a.m.

Following are the current watches and warnings in effect:

Hurricane Warning

—Grand Isle, Louisiana to the Alabama/Florida border

—Metropolitan New Orleans and Lake Pontchartrain

Storm Surge Warning

—Morgan City, Louisiana to the Okaloosa/Walton county line

—Northern and western shores of Lake Pontchartrain

Tropical Storm Warning

—Lake Maurepas

—West of Grand Isle to Morgan City, Louisiana

—East of the Alabama/Florida border to Indian Pass

Hurricane Watch

—Lake Maurepas

—East of the Alabama/Florida border to the Okaloosa/Walton county line

—West of Grand Isle to Morgan City, Louisiana

Storm Surge Watch

—East of the the Okaloosa/Walton county line to Indian Pass

Tropical Storm Watch

—East of the Okaloosa/Walton county line to Indian Pass

—West of Morgan City to Intracoastal City, Louisiana

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7 A.M. UPDATE

Nate continues to intensify as NOAA and Air Force Reserve Hurricane Hunter aircraft reported increased maximum sustained wind speeds of 85 mph in the 7 a.m. report by the National Hurricane Center.

Officials are keeping a close eye on the storm, which is currently at Category 1 status, but moving closer to the 96 mph needed to become a low Category 2 storm.

The question is if the storm has enough time to intensify to the next hurricane class. In the latest report, Nate was positioned 245 miles south-southeast from the mouth of the Mississippi River.

Nate did maintain its current north-northwest track at a rapid 22 mph while the minimum central pressure slightly dropped to 986 millibars (29.12 inches).

As for Northwest Florida, the wait continues if Nate will break early toward the northeast as forecast. At 7 a.m. there were no changes to the previous advisories with the area from the Alabama/Florida border to the Okaloosa/Walton county line remaining under a Hurricane Watch, Tropical Storm Warning and Storm Surge Warning.

Of note early Saturday morning is storm surge is already being felt locally. The Okaloosa County Sheriff's Office reported that a low-lying area of Meigs Drive in Shalimar was already under water and the roadway was blocked off to traffic.

A Hurricane Watch means that hurricane conditions are possible within the watch area.

A Tropical Storm Warning means that tropical storm conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area.

A Storm Surge Warning is defined as the danger of life-threatening inundation from rising water moving inland from the shoreline somewhere within the specified area.

On the forecast track, the center of Nate will move across the central and northern Gulf of Mexico today and will make landfall along the central U.S. Gulf coast tonight.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 35 miles from the center and tropical storm force winds extend outward up to 125 miles.

The Hurricane Center has issued the following storm surge projections should Nate hit during high tide:

Morgan City, Louisiana to the mouth of the Mississippi River: 4 to 6 feet

Mouth of the Mississippi River to the Alabama/Florida border: 5 to 9 feet

Alabama/Florida border to the Okaloosa/Walton county line: 4 to 6 feet

Okaloosa/Walton county line to Indian Pass: 2 to 4 feet

Indian Pass to Crystal River: 1 to 3 feet

Unfortunately, there is high tide during the overnight hours Saturday night as Nate's center draws near. Here are the times of high tide, in local time, for several locations that are expected to see storm surge flooding from Nate:

Grayton Beach: Saturday, 9:24 p.m.

Okaloosa Island: Saturday, 9:34 p.m.

Navarre Beach: Saturday, 9:35 p.m.

East Pass, Destin: Saturday, 11:49 p.m.

Dauphin Island, Alabama: Saturday 11:50 p.m.

Pensacola: Sunday, 12:19 a.m.

Following are the current watches and warnings in effect:

Hurricane Warning

—Grand Isle, Louisiana to the Alabama/Florida border

—Metropolitan New Orleans and Lake Pontchartrain

Storm Surge Warning

—Morgan City, Louisiana to the Okaloosa/Walton county line

—Northern and western shores of Lake Pontchartrain

Tropical Storm Warning

—Lake Maurepas

—West of Grand Isle to Morgan City, Louisiana

—East of the Alabama/Florida border to the Okaloosa/Walton county line.

Hurricane Watch

—Lake Maurepas

—East of the Alabama/Florida border to the Okaloosa/Walton county line

—West of Grand Isle to Morgan City, Louisiana

Storm Surge Watch

—East of the the Okaloosa/Walton county line to Indian Pass

Tropical Storm Watch

—East of the Okaloosa/Walton county line to Indian Pass

—West of Morgan City to Intracoastal City, Louisiana

4 A.M. UPDATE

After reaching hurricane status late Friday night, Nate experienced no further intensification overnight, according to the 4 a.m. report from the National Hurricane Center.

An Air Force reconnaissance plane recorded no change in maximum sustained winds, which remained at 80 mph. Nate was moving north-northwest at 22 mph, though its minimum central pressure dipped slightly to 987 millibars (29.15 inches).

In the early morning report, the storm was positioned 345 miles south-southeast of the Mississippi River.

As for Northwest Florida, the wait continues if Nate will break early toward the northeast as forecast. At 4 a.m. there were no changes to the previous advisories with the area from the Alabama/Florida border to the Okaloosa/Walton county line remaining under a Hurricane Watch, Tropical Storm Warning and Storm Surge Warning.

A Hurricane Watch means that hurricane conditions are possible within the watch area.

A Tropical Storm Warning means that tropical storm conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area.

A Storm Surge Warning is defined as the danger of life-threatening inundation from rising water moving inland from the shoreline somewhere within the specified area.

The Hurricane Center report stated that Nate's current north-northwest path is expected to continue through tonight. A turn toward the north is forecast early Sunday morning, followed by a turn toward the north-northeast thereafter.

On the forecast track, the center of Nate will move across the Gulf of Mexico today and make landfall along the central U.S. Gulf Coast at some point tonight.

The Weather Channel reported that Nate's center will make one or more landfalls along the northern Gulf Coast, between southeast Louisiana and the far western Florida Panhandle, Saturday night into early Sunday, most likely as a Category 1 hurricane.

The unpredictability of the storm continues to keep weather experts from predicting an exact spot for landfall as a possible early movement northeast remains in play. Better analysis will be available in upcoming reports Saturday morning as more Hurricane Hunter aircraft continue to examine Nate.

Here's a timeline of events with this storm, according to Weather Channel experts:

Saturday: Last hours to prepare; swells arrive along the northern Gulf Coast with some potential coastal flooding; outer rain bands arrive at the coast and spread inland; Tropical storm force winds arrive mid-to-late afternoon along the coast.

Saturday night: Damaging, hurricane-force winds possible in hurricane warning and possibly in watch areas; landfall expected overnight with storm surge flooding in surge flood warning and possibly watch areas; bands of heavy rain; worst of the impacts likely to the north and east of the center track.

Sunday morning: Again, landfall could occur in pre-dawn hours with storm surge flooding, hurricane or tropical storm-force winds near and east of the center; areas of heavy rain spread into other parts of the Southeast, southern Appalachians.

Sunday afternoon/night: Nate weakens over the Tennessee Valley with some lingering gusty winds but heavy, potentially flooding rain continues in the Appalachians, Tennessee Valley.

Monday: Lingering heavy rain, flash flooding possible in the Appalachians and parts of the Northeast.

Following are the current watches and warnings in effect:

Hurricane Warning

—Grand Isle, Louisiana to the Alabama/Florida border

—Metropolitan New Orleans and Lake Pontchartrain

Storm Surge Warning

—Morgan City, Louisiana to the Okaloosa/Walton county line

—Northern and western shores of Lake Pontchartrain

Tropical Storm Warning

—Lake Maurepas

—West of Grand Isle to Morgan City, Louisiana

—East of the Alabama/Florida border to the Okaloosa/Walton county line.

Hurricane Watch

—Lake Maurepas

—East of the Alabama/Florida border to the Okaloosa/Walton county line

—West of Grand Isle to Morgan City, Louisiana

Storm Surge Watch

—East of the the Okaloosa/Walton county line to Indian Pass

Tropical Storm Watch

—East of the Okaloosa/Walton county line to Indian Pass

—West of Morgan City to Intracoastal City, Louisiana