CRESTVIEW — Cold weather Monday didn't deter visitors from the Full Moon Indian Hunting Camp near the Crestview Community Center.


CRESTVIEW — Cold weather Monday didn't deter visitors from the Full Moon Indian Hunting Camp near the Crestview Community Center.



Kids bundled in jackets and blankets listened to Farris "Blue Herron" Powell give a brief history of American Indians who settled across the southeastern United States.



Powell spoke on Creek Indian culture — namely the tribe’s hunting techniques and trading deerskins with European settlers — and on traditional clothing and games. He displayed authentic tools, hunting spears and a musket and explained the weapons’ evolution.



He also aimed to dispel cultural myths.



"You didn't throw your (tomahawk) at your enemy (during battle),” Powell said, referring to misrepresentations on TV and film. "If you threw it and missed, then your enemy had the chance to pick it up and use against you."



Visitors — treated to soffkee, a traditional, grits-like food, and pumpkin donut holes — said they enjoyed the exhibition.



"I really liked the weapons part (of the program); my favorite was the tomahawk," Ethan Howard, 9, said.



Others liked Niceville musician Dale Palmer’s American Indian-inspired flute music.



"I thought it was the best," said Johnny Humphrey, 8, whose parents, Cathy and John Sr., took him and his three siblings to the event. "I liked the entire thing, especially the music.”



"We try to come out here when they have something going on,” Cathy said, referring to library-supported events.



Powell, who educates Floridians and Alabamians on southeastern American Indians, said the program will return more frequently. 



"I usually only do this program about every other year, but (the library) has invited me to come back next year."