Have you thought about collecting Social Security? The answer probably depends on your age. Still, you'll want to consider the best way of incorporating Social Security benefits into your retirement income strategy.


Have you thought about collecting Social Security? The answer probably depends on your age. Still, you'll want to consider the best way of incorporating Social Security benefits into your retirement income strategy.



If you have several decades to go until you retire, you might be wondering if Social Security will even be there for you. The Social Security system is experiencing a sharply declining worker-to-beneficiary ratio. Fewer workers are contributing to Social Security while the huge baby boom generation is retiring and taking money out.



Still, Social Security has enough money to pay full retirement benefits to eligible Americans until 2038, according to the Congressional Budget Office.



After that point, benefits would have to be reduced unless changes are made to the Social Security system. And several changes have indeed been proposed. Since we have nearly 25 years until benefit cuts may need to be made, it seems reasonable that some type of solution could be reached to put Social Security back on solid ground. 



In any case, when thinking about your  retirement income, you need to focus on  things that you can control — such  as when to start taking Social Security  and how you can supplement your benefits.



 Depending on when you were born,  your “full” retirement age, as far as  collecting Social Security benefits, is  likely 66 or 67. You can start  getting your checks as early as 62,  but if you do, your monthly payments  could be reduced by as much as 30 percent  — and this reduction is permanent.



Consequently, if you can support your  lifestyle from other income sources — such as earnings from employment  and withdrawals from your IRA and  401(k) — you may want to postpone  taking Social Security until you reach  your full retirement age. In fact, you  can get even bigger monthly checks if  you delay taking your benefits beyond your full retirement age, although your  payments will “max out” once you  reach 70. Other factors, such as your anticipated longevity, should also enter into your  calculations in considering when to  take Social Security.



Your retirement  income may also include withdrawals  from retirement accounts, such as an  IRA and a 401(k), along with other  investments, such as a fixed annuity.



And these other accounts are quite important because Social Security provides, on average, only about 40 percent of retirement income for the average 65-year-old.



In the years and decades before you retire, contribute as much as you can afford to these other accounts. Given the advances in medical  care and the greater awareness of healthy  lifestyles, people are living longer than  ever — which means you could spend  two, or even three, decades in retirement.



To enjoy those years fully, you’ll need adequate income. 



Joe Faulk is a financial adviser.