You've probably heard the phrase, “Many a truth is told in jest,” or some version of it. Geoffrey Chaucer included this sentiment in "The Cook's Tale," written in 1390.


You've probably heard the phrase, “Many a truth is told in jest,” or some version of it. Geoffrey Chaucer included this sentiment in "The Cook's Tale," written in 1390.



Sometimes, we see the truth in stories and jokes.



Paul M. Miller compiled and edited a collection of church jokes for "The World’s Greatest Collection of Church Jokes" (Barbour Publishing, 2003).



In it, there is a story about Mr. and Mrs. Peterson, who have different priorities during church.



After the service, Mrs. Peterson asks her husband, “Do you think that Johnson girl is coloring her hair?”



“I didn’t even see her,” Mr. Peterson says.



“And the dress Martha Hansen was wearing,” Mrs. Peterson says. "Really, don’t tell me you think that’s the proper outfit for a mother of two.”



 “I’m afraid I didn’t notice that, either,” Mr. Peterson says.



 “Oh, for heaven’s sake,” Mrs. Peterson snaps. “A lot of good it does for you to go to church.”



Many a truth is told in jest. Do you know someone like Mrs. Peterson? Are you like her, paying attention to the wrong things during worship?



The Rev. Mark Broadhead is Laurel Hill Presbyterian Church and First Presbyterian Church of Crestview’s pastor.