CRESTVIEW — Walker Elementary School was full of activity Tuesday evening as students and their families browsed books, admired art and performed science experiments.


CRESTVIEW — Walker Elementary School was full of activity Tuesday evening as students and their families browsed books, admired art and performed science experiments.



See photos from the fair>>



Combining the three subjects into one fair helps each student find something to enjoy, Principal Jeanine Kirkland said.



"We have to have a little variety," she said. "Our children are talented in different ways."



In the library, visitors had photos taken with Clifford, the Big Red Dog while selecting reading material at the Scholastic Books fair.



Fourth-grader Bret Castille, who said he enjoys reading, thoroughly perused every book-laden table before making his selections.



"I like to read 'Diary of a Wimpy Kid' books," Bret said, adding he has read most of author Jeff Kinney's books.



Third-grader Vince Lancaster couldn't wait to show his mom, Petra Pistorius, the Egyptian-themed cat sculpture he made in art teacher Sarah Harris's class.



"That's all gold spray paint," he said, turning the golden work of art so his mother could admire it.



Other art included decorated miniature sarcophagi, brightly colored pharaoh masks and paper mosaics. When Queen Cleopatra appeared, as portrayed by Kirkland, the ancient Egypt theme was complete.



CHS volunteers help



Volunteers from the Crestview High School cross country team helped teachers in the library, while their classmates in the leadership program helped the smaller kids conduct science experiments.



"It's fun," Crestview High junior Josh Cyrus said. "It's great helping the little kids."



Visitors browsed science fair projects and discovered fun facts, such as orange M&Ms melt faster in a microwave, on average, than other colors. Awards for winning projects were presented during the evening.



"It's always good to create little scientists," third-grade teacher Teri Boxberger said. "They may be curing us of some disease someday."



At the end of the main hall, the multi-purpose room was hopping as students took their "Passports to Science" from one experiment station to another, carefully recording their experiences at each.



Kids assembled human skeletons, created aluminum foil boats and tried to sink them by filling them with pennies, built toothpick and clay towers, launched paper airplanes, and found which ramp could send a Matchbox car careening across the floor the fastest.



"If you're at the higher ramp, you gain more speed," third-grader Augustine Caufield said after the experiment. "If you're at the lower ramp, you gain less speed."



"The evening turned out great for us," Boxberger said. "There were lots of excited kids and parents."